IDA Treaties Explorer Resources About Guide

Welcome to the IDA Treaties Explorer

While treaties between Indigenous peoples and the United States affect virtually every area in the USA, there is as yet no official list of all the treaties. The US National Archives holds 374 of the treaties, where they are known as the Ratified Indian Treaties. Here you can view them for the first time with key historic works that provide context to the agreements made and the histories of our shared lands.

374 Ratified Indian Treaties visible for the first time

Thanks to an anonymous donation, the US National Archives conserved and digitized the Ratified Indian treaties in its holdings. Here you can see the original documents spanning more than a hundred years.
Most are now available, and more will be added as the National Archives completes preservation and scanning.

Now Know Ye featuring George Washington's signature

Visualize some of the documents signed

The lack of an official list of treaties between the US and Native nations inevitably led to confusion. In the 1890s-1900s, government clerks attempted to get a handle on all the agreements that had been made regarding land. In a series of publications they mapped out the land transfers and called them “cessions”. Here you can see the historic maps and what agreements and tribes relate.

Details of california showing recognizable area and complex borders

Look at which historical and present day tribes are involved in the treaties

Who signed the treaties? Here you can see how tribes were named in the historic documents, the present day names of federally recognized tribes, and find documents they’re mentioned in. Selecting the currently recognized name of a tribe shows a map of recorded land transfers and timeline and links for treaties and land cessions.

Tribes associated with Cession 9

Look at places

Enter a zip code, name of a state, use your location, or zoom in on the map to start exploring land transfer agreements that relate to your place.

GIS map showing detailed boundaries in the midwest